Preliminary estimates of water use in the United States, 1990
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Preliminary estimates of water use in the United States, 1990

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Published by U.S. Geological Survey, Books and Open-File Reports Section, distributor] in Reston, VA, [Denver, Colo .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Water use -- United States,
  • Water consumption -- United States

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Wayne B. Solley and Robert R. Pierce
SeriesU.S. Geological Survey open-file report -- 92-63
ContributionsPierce, Robert R, Geological Survey (U.S.)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination5 leaves
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13615628M
OCLC/WorldCa28371086

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PRELIMINARY WATER-USE ESTIMATES Water withdrawal in the United States during is estimated to aver­ age , million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of freshwater and saline water for all offstream uses (table 1) 2 percent more than the : Wayne B. Solley, Robert R. Pierce. Estimates of water use in the western United States in and water-use trends report to the Western Water Policy Review Advisory Commission by Wayne B. Solley. Want to read; 29 Currently reading; Published by The Commission, National Technical Information Service [distributor in [Denver, Colo.?], Springfield, Va. Across the United States, the practices for collecting water use data vary significantly from state to state and vary also from one water use category to another, in response to the laws regulating water use and interest in water use data as an input for water management. Estimated use of water in the United States in Water withdrawals in the United States during were estimated to average , million gallons per day (Mgal/d) of freshwater and saline water for offstream uses percent more than the estimate.

Get this from a library! Preliminary estimates of water use in the United States, [Wayne B Solley; Geological Survey (U.S.)]. Water in the United States in , the USGS found that water use remains stable despite population growth, and that the chief water users for the Nation are power generation, agriculture and public water supply. The USGS report also finds that public supply use of water is rising, but not faster than population change. Since , USGS has. The USGS has estimated water use for the United States every 5 years since Estimates are provided for groundwater and surface-water sources, for fresh and saline water quality, and by sector or category of use. Estimates have been made at the State level since , and at .   Agriculture is a major user of ground and surface water in the United States, accounting for approximately 80 percent of the Nation's consumptive water use and over 90 percent in many Western States. Efficient irrigation systems and water management practices can help maintain farm profitability in an era of increasingly limited and more costly water supplies.

Visit to get more information about this book, to buy it in print, or to download it as a free PDF. Coefficient methods estimate water use, W, as the product of a relevant explanatory variable X Estimating Water Use in the United States. Water use in the United States in was estimated to be about billion gallons per day (Bgal/d), which was 9 percent less than in The estimates put total withdrawals at the lowest level since before , following the same overall trend of decreasing total withdrawals observed from to Freshwater withdrawals were Bgal/d, or 87 percent of total withdrawals, and. Estimates indicate that water use in the United States decreased from to , even though population continued to increase during the same period. The withdrawal of freshwater and saline water in the United States during is estimated to have been , million gal­ lons per day (Mgal/d) for all offstream uses. Brown Past and Future Freshwater Use in the United States Large Scale Water Use Data: Sources and Definitions Except for some early estimates of water use from the Census Bureau, this report relies on water-use data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The USGS has esti-mated the nation’s water use at five-year intervals since